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Grand Jury / Law / Power Structure

LEGAL JARGON – ROMAN COURT PROCEDURE

LEGAL JARGON – ROMAN COURT PROCEDURE

Roman legal procedure, long evolving system used in the Roman courts, which in its later stages formed the basis for modern procedure in civil-law countries. There were three main, overlapping stages of development: the legis actiones, which dates from the 5th-century bce law code known as theTwelve Tables until the late 2nd century; the formulary system, from the 2nd century bce until the end of the Classical period (3rd century ce); and the cognitio extraordinaria, in operation during the post-Classical period.

The procedure under the legis actiones was divided into several steps. First, the plaintiff approached the defendant in public and called for him to come to court. If he refused, he could be taken there by force. The trial itself was divided into two parts. The first was a preliminary hearing held before a magistrate who decided whether there was an issue to be contested and, if so, what it was. Each step in this procedure was extremely formal. If the wrong words were used by either party, that party might lose the case. After the issues were delineated and sureties set, both parties agreed upon a judex, who was neither a lawyer nor a magistrate but a prominent layman, to try the case. The proceedings before the judex were more informal: advocates spoke and gave evidence, and witnesses often appeared. Thejudex made a decision but had no power to execute it. If the defendant refused to pay the fine or make restitution within a certain period of time, he could be brought by force to the magistrate. Then his property could be seized, or he could be made slave to the plaintiff to work off the debt or property claim.

During the later republic, as cases became more complex, it became necessary to write down the issues that had to be presented to the judex, thus leading to the formulary system, under which the defendant was still summoned by the plaintiff to appear in court; there were still two parts to the trial, but the magistrate had greater power to determine whether the case would go to the judex.

Under the cognitio extraordinaria much greater power was placed in the hands of the magistrate and the courts. The summons was issued by the court, the trial was held exclusively before the magistrate, and the court became responsible for the execution of the sentence. Further, there developed a system of appeal. Thus, the state became involved in the administration of justice and the enforcement of its rules of law in a manner similar to that of modern European states.

Written by: The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica

Useful link: http://euro-union-court.org/info_roman_court_procedures/info_roman_court_presumptions.html

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